El mar (Rafael Alberti)

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Land’s End, Cornwall © Southampton Old Lady

Further to last week’s Music Monday about the sea, I also lived by the sea in Southern Spain and fell in love with the flamenco culture of the region. Here is part of a poem (with an approximate translation) by Rafael Alberti. He is one of my favourite poets who was born by the sea in Puerto de Santa Maria in the province of Cádiz, Spain, but moved with his family in order to live in Madrid,the capital city, when he was fifteen. Here he expresses his saudade or homesickness for the sea.

Click here too for the words sung in flamenco by  Lady Hagua

El mar. La mar.  The sea (m). The sea (f).
El mar. ¡Sólo la mar!    The sea (m). Only the sea!
¿Por qué me trajiste, padre,   Why did you bring me, father,
a la ciudad?   to the town?
¿Por qué me desenterraste   Why did you unearth me
del mar?   from the sea?
En sueños la marejada   In a dream, the swell
me tira del corazón;  is drawing my heart;
se lo quisiera llevar.  It would like to carry me off.
Padre, ¿por qué me trajiste   Father, why did you bring
acá?  me here?

Poem from Found Print 5: SMA-CK

Fifth in my series of poems reworked from found trivial printed matter

From Virgin Media promotional magazine 2016 © Southampton Old Lady
From Virgin Media promotional magazine 2016 © Southampton Old Lady

 

SMA-CK

(View the big star. Get more than means. A-lister in hi-def!)

SLAP

Critical drama

man and Sars

with touch

Disciple is own

begin new

BBQ scene

escalates the nightmare

man slaps misbehaving

on lifetime

Poem reworked from Virgin Media 2016 pg 7

© Southampton Old Lady

Poetry from found print 3

Third in my series of poetry re-worked from found print trivia

Aute-Out from Metro January 2016 © Southampton Old Lady
Aute-Out from Metro January 2016 © Southampton Old Lady

In Sociation

choose self-adjusting bangles

future of hi-tech fashion

never comfortable

increasingly transformed into world trackers

tech-infused hook-ups

strutting Machina

smarts on your wrist,

innovative ways

sensors track your emotions

keep out

personal space fashion

never how?

re-worked from  Metro 4th March 2016, pg 35

Poetry from Found Print 1

First in my new series of poetry re-worked from found print trivia

From Cosmopolitan January 2016, pg 43 © Southampton Old Lady
From Cosmopolitan January 2016, pg 43 © Southampton Old Lady

Brit 20 Left Centre

All Lie

Our half is other half

transitioned experiences with me in age,

moments finding

connection my same

with everyone

how that mature grown-up loves

young cheesy energy

Even crazy house thought funny

When was getting normal thing

she supports fashion

show messages like mine.

Mo Tan 3

Poetry From Found Print 2

2nd in my series of re-worked poetry from found print trivia

From Cosmopolitan January 2016, pg 95 © Southampton Old Lady
From Cosmopolitan January 2016, pg 95 © Southampton Old Lady

Ove

At lights

distance blink artfully –

while help her target

exactly right pace.

Power, strength,

essential corporate development

her hectic motivation to stress,

focused tricky start alone:

successful executives and Management Women

awards – discovered cracked

reasons enhanced and uplift creativity.

 

Want Motion

Striking Research 9%

more boost oxygen of grey-matter areas

way explains social innovation

Good Women practice outcome

and the close visualise treadmill of Human

can-do fuels goals

making improvements

committing time.

Mo Tan 95

Harp Song of the Dane Women

By Rudyard Kipling

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WHAT is a woman that you forsake her, 
And the hearth-fire and the home-acre. 
To go with the old grey Widow-maker? 

She has no house to lay a guest in
But one chill bed for all to rest in, 
That the pale suns and the stray bergs nest in. 

She has no strong white arms to fold you, 
But the ten-times-fingering weed to hold you 
Out on the rocks where the tide has rolled you. 

Yet, when the signs of summer thicken, 
And the ice breaks, and the birch-buds quicken, 
Yearly you turn from our side, and sicken— 

Sicken again for the shouts and the slaughters. 
You steal away to the lapping waters, 
And look at your ship in her winter-quarters. 

You forget our mirth, and talk at the tables, 
The kine in the shed and the horse in the stables 
To pitch her sides and go over her cables. 

Then you drive out where the storm-clouds swallow, 
And the sound of your oar-blades, falling hollow, 
Is all we have left through the months to follow. 

Ah, what is Woman that you forsake her, 
And the hearth-fire and the home-acre, 
To go with the old grey Widow-maker?

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Rudyard Kipling, a renowned English poet brought up in India. He is more famous these days for writing The Jungle Book, but extracts from his powerful poems are often quoted and he has inspired many writers.

This poem was first published in Puck of Pook’s Hill in 1906. It has always stuck in my memory, perhaps because I was brought up in Southampton, England, where a community where fathers (and in my case my mother) would go to sea for long periods. There are often reports of shipwrecks and drownings. I snapped this photo yesterday of a very grey sea and recalled the “old grey Widow-maker”.